Colorado's Premier Art Event
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Congratulations to our

2019 Award Winners & Showcased Artists

Congratulations to our 2019 Award Winners! All participating artists were scored by an on-site jury panel. The following artists were given high markings for advanced technical achievement within their fine art category as well as high scores for originality and creativity. Many of these artists will return in 2020 so keep your eyes peeled and stop by their booth at next year’s festival.

Best In Show: Prince Duncan-Williams, Mixed Media

‘6 Maasai Warriors’ by Prince Duncan-Williams

‘6 Maasai Warriors’ by Prince Duncan-Williams

 
 

Few musical styles are as colorful as jazz, and artist Prince Duncan-Williams knows this. Composed of silk as smooth as the music of John Coltrane and with an explosive vivacity of colorful silk threads that bring to mind the frenzied syncopation of New Orleans-style jazz, Prince’s silk mosaics succeed in creating something of a miracle: jazz without sound. He was born in Ghana in West Africa into a family tradition of working with silk thread art that was nearly four generations in the making. These silk threads are the same threads that are used to make Royal Kente, the cloth famously used for royal clothing for the Akan people.

- Artist Bio, www.princeduncanwilliams.com


2nd Place: Andrew Carson, Sculpture

‘Bronzinator’ by Andrew Carson

‘Bronzinator’ by Andrew Carson

 
 


I draw my pieces very carefully and then cut out and fabricate metal and then kiln form glass. While cold connections are very obvious I do weld most items elegantly. There are details and movement you cannot see in slides.

- Artist Statement, Andrew Carson


3rd Place: Marvin Blackmore, Ceramics

‘White Rainbow Jar’ by Marvin Blackmore

‘White Rainbow Jar’ by Marvin Blackmore

 
 

Marvin Blackmore was born in Farmington, New Mexico; at the age of 7 his family moved to Cortez, Colorado, where he was raised in the heart of Southwestern art. Being exposed to many various forms of art allowed Blackmore to escape a difficult childhood. Throughout the years he has mastered the art of pottery and is always innovating new ideas.
His pottery reflects multiple layers of clay slips in which he etches through to each wanted layer. The smallest of pieces takes a minimum of 130 hours.

- Artist Bio, www.blackmorepottery.co

 


Juror Award: Scott Hildebrandt, Sculpture

‘Boom Box’ by Scott Hildebrandt

‘Boom Box’ by Scott Hildebrandt

 


My love of miniatures goes way back to my childhood when I used to spend hours and hours with my Grandfather who was a model train enthusiast. Affectionately nick-named "Mister Christmas," I have combined my passion for miniatures with my passion for the holidays. (You should see my elaborate holiday light display!!) I build miniature vignettes using vintage clocks, cameras, radios, volt meters, airplane pieces, antique children's toys, and various other vintage and antique vessels. Each scene is one-of-a-kind and always includes tiny pieces of magic, like tiny trees, buildings, automobiles, and animals. Most pieces are lit using small LED lights and most pieces include moving parts and other interesting ideas that make each viewer feel like a kid in a candy store. I enjoy finding new ways to repurpose discarded antique vessels and giving them new life. Each of my pieces is made in my studio space at the Curtice Street Art Co op in Littleton, CO.

- Artist Bio, www.clevermisterchristmas.com


Juror Award: Ben Foster, Metal

‘The Symphony Of Love’ by Ben Foster

‘The Symphony Of Love’ by Ben Foster

 


Living near the Wind River Mountains in Wyoming with his wife and three children, Ben draws his inspiration from the beautiful surroundings and abundant wildlife. His desire to sculpt began at the age of nineteen.

Today, more than 20 years later, his works are displayed throughout the US and internationally in both public venues and private collections.

Each sculpture begins with a block of clay, various wood and metal sculpting tools and an imagination! Ben’s work captures an essence of creation that reaches out, touches us,and draws us to it. Once Ben completes the sculpture in clay, he then makes a silicon “mother” mold that will be used to replicate a limited edition of his original sculpture. The mold is taken to the art foundry where the bronze casting process begins. Each casting is created using the ancient “lost-wax” casting method. A hand-applied, chemical patina completes the sculpture!

- Artist Bio, www.benfosterbronze.com


Juror Award: Henry Bergeson, Mixed Media

‘Honey Jar Kaleidoscope’ by Henry Bergeson

‘Honey Jar Kaleidoscope’ by Henry Bergeson

 
 

Henry Bergeson says this matter-of-factly as the snow falls gently on his mountaintop home. During his youth, Henry developed a love for things mechanical.

He took his love and ability to a new level with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. He was uncomfortable, though, with the analytical “hands-off” approach to engineering.

Through the “real world” job experience, he developed a sense of the design. He was laid-off during the downturn in business in 1987, so he packed up and moved west. In Colorado, his new home, he followed his intuition and tried his hand at kaleidoscope building. And, well…the rest is in the making.

- Artist Bio, www.henrybergesonkaleidoscopes.com


2019 Showcased Artists

A CBAF organized committee selected these two artists to be showcased artists for 2019. These artists generously donated their work to be used for marketing, promotion and merchandising which in turn gave these artists exposure pre, during and post Festival.

‘Beaver Creek’ by Greg Dye

‘Beaver Creek’ by Greg Dye

 

Greg Dye - Painting

I am a self taught artist who paints with palette knives and applies spontaneous strokes of thick oil paint. I do not think about it, I just react to the paint and the emotional energy within myself. My goal is to convey motion and spiritual energy in my personal vision of the Southwest.

- Artist Statement, www.gregdye.com


‘Cosmic Bison’ by Haylee McFarland

‘Cosmic Bison’ by Haylee McFarland

 

Haylee McFarland - Drawing and Graphic Arts

I use watercolor in order to create a stunning effect that accentuates my sketches. More interestingly, I follow this with 50-70 hours with a .005 Micron Pen, creating very small intricate zentangle-inspired designs within my artwork. Inking second frees my mind to create freely within each piece.

- Artist Statement, www.hmdesignstudios.com